In the News

MobileSyrup: CRTC won’t force Bell to publicly disclose sales agent compensation figures

Canada’s telecom watchdog won’t force Montreal-based telecom service provider Bell to publicly disclose how much its sale agents earn through the carrier’s various sales channels.

According to a November 7th, 2018 Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) letter posted to PIAC executive director and general counsel John Lawford, Bell established “that the likelihood of specific and direct harm outweighs the public interest in the disclosure of the designated information.”

The request was filed by the Fair Communications Sales Coalition — a consumer group comprised of the Public Interest Advocacy Centre (PIAC), the Association of Community Organizations for Reform Now (ACORN) Canada, the National Pensioners Federation (NPF) and the Canadian Association of Retired Persons (CARP) — on November 2nd, 2018.

MobileSyrup: Consumer groups advocate for new code of conduct, suitability rules on day two of CRTC hearings

A coalition of four Canadian consumer advocacy organizations delivered testimony on the second day of the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission’s (CRTC) unsavoury telecom sales practices hearings.

Representatives from the Fair Communications Sales Coalition (FCSC) — comprised of the Public Interest Advocacy Centre (PIAC), the Association of Community Organizations for Reform Now Canada (ACORN Canada), the National Pensioners Federation (NPF) and the Canadian Association of Retired Persons (CARP) — used their time to further advocate for the implementation of a new telecom sales code of conduct, while also arguing in favour of implementing suitability rules within Canada’s telecommunications industry.


CBC: Cellphone retailers fail mystery shopping test, researchers plan to tell CRTC inquiry

When Sean Grassie​, Kristianne Anor and Tara Hristov headed to cellphone retailers in the Ottawa area recently, they weren't your average customers looking for a cellphone plan — they were University of Ottawa law students, on assignment as mystery shoppers.

Their mission? To test the consumer experience at the cellphone counter.

The students and the team's co-leader will present their "frustrating" findings today in Gatineau, Que., at a week-long CRTC public hearing into misleading and aggressive sales practices by Canada's telecom service providers.


CBC News: CRTC hears more calls for constraints on sales tactics of cable, internet firms

A coalition of groups representing consumers, seniors and low-income Canadians is recommending tough new rules to rein in the sales practices of Canada's telecommunications firms.

The groups made a joint submission Tuesday during the second day of CRTC hearings in Gatineau, Quebec. The CRTC is looking at whether cable and internet companies have been using aggressive or misleading sales pitches to sell their products.

John Lawford, executive director of the Public Interest Advocacy Centre, told CRTC commissioners the problem is severe even if cable companies won't admit it.

"The companies are in denial. They have major sales problems," Lawford said.

 

MobileSyrup: Rogers, Bell, Telus to CRTC: no evidence of widespread sales practice problem

Roughly two weeks after Canada’s Big Three carriers refuted claims of aggressive or misleading telecom sales practices in a Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) request for information, Rogers, Bell and Telus have filed new documents doubling down on their belief that there is no unsavoury telecom sales problem in Canada.